Tag Archives: NJ Veterinarian

But Fifi, It’s Cold Outside! (Dr. Weiner)

 Buy cheap and genuine Windows 7 product key  |
 Windows 7 Ultimate ISO download  |
 Windows 7 Product Key Generator For 32&64 Bits  |
 Windows 7 Product Key Online Store  |
 Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 Product Key Sale  |
 Windows 7 Key  |
 Get Free Newest Windows 7 Product Key  |
 Windows 7 Product Key for 32bit/64bit Updated 2016  |
 Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus 14 serial key dowload  |
 Windows 7 Professional Download ISO Free Download  |
windows 10 education key
windows 10 enterprise mak
office 2010 key
windows 7 key sale
windows 10 home-key
windows 10 education
windows 10 pro key
office 2016 key
windows 10 key
office 2013 key
windows 10 home edition
windows 7 key
windows 10 activation key

            How about this weather folks?  The polar vortex brings back memories of the cold, dark winters of my childhood in northern New England.   The below freezing days and snowy nights remind me of school ski trips, epic snowball battles and warming up with some hot cocoa by the fireplace.   As fun as reminiscing is, I do need to take extra time and care this time of year to keep my loved ones and myself safe.  My pets are an important part of my family and they require special consideration.  Since I’m sure you feel the same way, I will share some important winter safety tips.

            Alas, gentle readers, this arctic weather has really taken a toll on my morning snooze button time.  This time of the year my quick exit strategies to get my son to daycare and myself to OCVH each morning needing major adjustments.  We both have to perform what seems like an epic search for boots, coats, gloves, ice crampons (of course I jest) and other essential winter gear before heading out to the car.  Wouldn’t life be easier if we all had natural winter gear – like a nice fur coat perhaps?  This cold weather should not be any problem for our cats and dogs right?  For some breeds this is true, but most of our furry companions are used to living inside.   Since most dogs and cat spend all year in our warm houses, they often do not develop a full winter coat needed to sufficiently protect them for long periods outside in the extreme weather.  Also, remember that the coat is of limited benefit if it gets wet.   Do not count on your pet’s coat to completely protect him or her from the terrible weather we have been having lately.  Sure those sweaters and booties may look silly, but some breeds need help staying warm.  I would not let my son go outside without a coat and you should not let your Doberman puppy or Chihuahua go out unprotected either.  Also, use common sense about how long your pet is allowed outside. Watch for signs that Fido really needs to come back in, such as shivering, holding up paws, reluctance to move, whining, or scraping at the door.

           Although your dog would never admit it, he or she may be hiding a health condition that could put them at greater risk in the cold weather.  Problems like kidney disease, diabetes or heart disease can compromise the body’s ability to deliver the proper amount of blood to the vital organs in times of stress.  Without proper blood supply these pets have a very hard time keeping themselves warm which puts them at higher risk for having rapid worsening of their disease or developing secondary diseases.  Additionally, older pets with arthritis are sure to have a harder time when the temperatures drop.  Activities like climbing the stairs or walking down the block can be very difficult when it is cold and icy outside.   Monitor your furred senior citizens closely and be aware that there are medical measures that we can take to keep your pet comfortable this winter.   Anti-inflammatory medications, targeted laser therapy with a K-laser and intelligent exercise restriction are all proven methods to keep your older dog or cat enjoying his or her days, even when it cold and nasty outside.

          When bringing your pet outside in the cold, be sure to watch for shivering, whining, decreased response to your voice or command and unwillingness to move.  All of these can be warning signs for hypothermia.  If noted, your pet should be brought to a warm place immediately.   Pets with thin fur coats or minimal coverage of high-risk areas, like the tail or ears, need to be monitored very closely.  Be sure to use common sense and remember that there truly is some weather that is not fit for man NOR beast.

          We have many things that allow us to be more productive and comfortable, even in the worst winter weather.  Unfortunately, we need to be cognizant that some of these comforts can also be health risks to our pets.  Antifreeze is very sweet and may seem like a tempting treat to your furry pal.  However, it is very toxic and the ingestion of even a small amount can be fatal.  While there is an antidote, treatment must be started very quickly after exposure to be effective.  Please make sure any antifreeze is stored safely away from your little ones (furry or otherwise) and that you check your vehicles regularly for leaks.  In addition, certain types of deicers can be toxic or irritating to your pets’ paws.  I recommend using pet safe products only and wiping your dog’s feet off after walking outside during the winter months.  Also, if you have an open fireplace or use candles, be sure that your pets are not left by unattended when they are lit.   No one thinks that their dog would allow their tail to catch on fire or that their cat would really knock over a candle, but it definitely does happen.   Space heaters should be used with extreme caution due to the fire hazard and carbon monoxide risks.

            I have one final animal care tip during these chilly times.   Please be sure to bang on your hood before starting your car engine in the morning.  When it is this cold, a nice warm motor compartment may be a tempting night time shelter for neighborhood cats.  It is better to scare them away than to have them be badly injured by the moving parts.

           Stay warm and safe everyone.  Let’s all think warm thoughts and hope Punxsutawney Phil wasn’t totally right!

Zach Weiner DVM

Shining A Light On Your Pet’s Pain Relief (Dr. Pearlman)

 Buy cheap and genuine Windows 7 product key  |
 Windows 7 Ultimate ISO download  |
 Windows 7 Product Key Generator For 32&64 Bits  |
 Windows 7 Product Key Online Store  |
 Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 Product Key Sale  |
 Windows 7 Key  |
 Get Free Newest Windows 7 Product Key  |
 Windows 7 Product Key for 32bit/64bit Updated 2016  |
 Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus 14 serial key dowload  |
 Windows 7 Professional Download ISO Free Download  |
windows 10 education key
windows 10 enterprise mak
office 2010 key
windows 7 key sale
windows 10 home-key
windows 10 education
windows 10 pro key
office 2016 key
windows 10 key
office 2013 key
windows 10 home edition
windows 7 key
windows 10 activation key

If pets could talk, many would probably ask for K-Laser therapy and to have those treatments done at OCVH, of course!  Class 4 (the most advanced) therapy Lasers are used to treat arthritis, fractures, ear infections and many other conditions that affect our pets. Laser treatments have been used in human medicine in Europe for over 20 years and were approved for use in the United States about 10 years ago. Medical doctors, chiropractors and physical therapists all use the K-Laser to help their patients. Professional sports teams have also started using this healing modality.

 

Laser treatments work by delivering energy in the form of light waves past the fur and skin into deeper tissues where healing is needed – for example, an arthritic hip joint in an older dog. Arthritis occurs because hip joint has lost much of its joint fluid for lubrication and some of the cartilage has been replaced by bone. Why K-Laser?  All of these changes lead to one thing – pain!!  The Laser helps the body heal more quickly and dramatically reduce pain at the source.  Some dogs with arthritis or back pain that needed assistance to get into the clinic for the first few Laser sessions and have been able to walk on their own again.  The Laser also has many other uses such as wound healing, soft tissue sprains, infections, gingivitis and more.

 

At OCVH we like use the K-Laser because it is a pain-free, drug-free treatment option for many degenerative conditions in our pets. Typically a Laser session takes around 5 minutes for each area to be treated. For a chronic condition like arthritis, pets would likely need to have treatments several times each week for the first 2-3 weeks, and then the frequency of visits decreases. Some pets continue to have treatments on an as needed basis to maintain their comfort. During therapy you will be with your pet and you get to wear fancy, protective safety goggles.  Pets very quickly learn that the Laser does not hurt and actually helps them feel better. My own dogs love the extra TLC. It feels good!

 

I have been able to witness the beneficial effects of this treatment on my very own dogs. Ginger, Sara, and Ernie have all gotten K-Laser treatments and are still doing well. Ginger, is 11 years and weighs 90 pounds.  She tore one of the cruciate ligaments in her knee – this is the most common orthopedic injury in large dogs. She had surgery on her knee over a year ago. We used the K-Laser on her injured leg as part of her rehabilitation program. She is able to walk normally now, and still gets the treatments once per week. Sarah, our 8 year old German Shepherd dog has one of the worst cases of hip dysplasia (her hips have been this bad since she was the age of 5 when we first rescued her), yet she is able to run and play without any arthritis drugs. Ernie came to us with a broken back and although he is still paralyzed in his back legs, he is pain free and we are hopeful that he will walk someday – with the help of the K-Laser.  Thanks to the K-Laser my dogs are living a better quality of life with more walks, more play, and lots more happy pain-free time.

 

There is hope, if your pet is in pain he or she may be helped by Laser therapy. Contact one of our staff members to schedule an appointment for a consultation to get started with K-Laser therapy. Your pet will thank you!

Laurie Pearlman DVM

Keep your Feline on the Mainline to Health! (by Dr. Iaquinto)

 Buy cheap and genuine Windows 7 product key  |
 Windows 7 Ultimate ISO download  |
 Windows 7 Product Key Generator For 32&64 Bits  |
 Windows 7 Product Key Online Store  |
 Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 Product Key Sale  |
 Windows 7 Key  |
 Get Free Newest Windows 7 Product Key  |
 Windows 7 Product Key for 32bit/64bit Updated 2016  |
 Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus 14 serial key dowload  |
 Windows 7 Professional Download ISO Free Download  |
windows 10 education key
windows 10 enterprise mak
office 2010 key
windows 7 key sale
windows 10 home-key
windows 10 education
windows 10 pro key
office 2016 key
windows 10 key
office 2013 key
windows 10 home edition
windows 7 key
windows 10 activation key

As humans, it is recommended to see your family physician once a year for your annual check up. Now imagine only seeing your doctor every 4-7 years! Do you think some medical problems would have easily been prevented or managed better with more frequent visits? That’s the concern with our feline family members. Since cats age more rapidly than people and are very good at hiding ailments, it is recommended they have twice yearly visits.

 

Twice yearly visits to OCVH, FVH or NPVH allow our veterinarians to examine your cat’s mouth and thoroughly examine her teeth. By three years old, 85% of cats have some form of dental disease. We can give you a detailed assessment of her dental health and give you recommendations on how to maintain it. We will listen to her heart and lungs. We will identify any murmurs (abnormal blood flow) or arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythms). This is very important as cats may not show any signs of heart disease until it is very advanced and then are at risk of sudden death. We will palpate her abdomen to assess organ size and any pain.  Lower urinary tract (bladder) disease is more prevalent in cats age 1 through 10, whereas upper urinary tract (kidney) disease is more prevalent in cats over 8 years old. We will check her weight and address any signs of obesity or weight loss. Overweight cats are more prone to diseases such as arthritis, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, constipation, and more. Weight loss may indicate metabolic disease, over active thyroid disease, or cancer. We will also assess her body condition, skin, coat, eyes, ears, lungs and neurologic health. Surprisingly 90% of cats over age 12 have some degree of arthritis! Most owners simply chalk it up to “slowing down” or “getting older” when actually these cats are experiencing pain. Many conditions are treatable with timely diagnosis and medical management.

During the physical examination the doctor will make recommendations for vaccines based on your cat’s lifestyle. The doctor may make recommendations for blood tests in senior cats or those that show changes from their previous visit. These tests allow us to address problems before they become too advanced or reduce your cat’s quality of life.  It gives us a chance to be proactive in preventing the complications frequently associated with medical problems. By investing twice yearly in exams, you may dramatically extend your cat’s lifespan and comfort.

Twice yearly visits also provide you with the opportunity to discuss any concerns you have with the doctor. It gives you a chance to share information with us as it pertains to your cat’s health and behavior. We value your insight! You are our eyes and ears in the home setting. By incorporating your observations with our medical findings and expertise we can help your cat live a longer and healthier life.

 

Erika Iaquinto DVM

 

 

An Alternative Approach to Vaccinations (By Dr. Lorri Mitchell)

 Buy cheap and genuine Windows 7 product key  |
 Windows 7 Ultimate ISO download  |
 Windows 7 Product Key Generator For 32&64 Bits  |
 Windows 7 Product Key Online Store  |
 Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 Product Key Sale  |
 Windows 7 Key  |
 Get Free Newest Windows 7 Product Key  |
 Windows 7 Product Key for 32bit/64bit Updated 2016  |
 Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus 14 serial key dowload  |
 Windows 7 Professional Download ISO Free Download  |
windows 10 education key
windows 10 enterprise mak
office 2010 key
windows 7 key sale
windows 10 home-key
windows 10 education
windows 10 pro key
office 2016 key
windows 10 key
office 2013 key
windows 10 home edition
windows 7 key
windows 10 activation key

Vaccination is a controversial subject in both the human and animal world. The dangers of an unprotected individual succumbing to disease need to be balanced against the risk of infrequent side effects from an approved vaccine. We have valid concerns about what vaccines should be administered and how often they should be given.

 

At Ocean County, Fischer and New Prospect Veterinary Hospitals we strive to stay current with the ever-changing world of vaccine recommendations for your pet. In past years, adaptation to new research and guidelines has resulted in several changes to keep our patients safe and protected. These include:
-moving to a three year interval for adult dogs getting the Distemper combination vaccine as new research showed they did not always need it yearly
-similarly, adult cats also get their Distemper combination vaccine every three years now
-we now use an improved Rabies vaccine for cats that has less additives and is therefore less reactive for them

In addition to the above, we recognize that each pet is unique and evaluate them at their yearly well-visit to determine which vaccines are best recommended for them. For example, an outdoor barn cat will have different risks than a strictly indoor-only solo cat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or a toy poodle that lives alone in a city setting will have different risks than a beagle or retriever who hikes and hunts. OCVH, FVH & NPVH veterinarians want to know the lifestyle your pet leads so we can help you make the right decisions for their well care.

Some of you may be familiar with the term “vaccine titer” (pronounced “tighter”) test. These tests have been around for a while but more and more pet owners are having these tests performed instead of boosting vaccines annually. They are available for some vaccines but not all. Most commonly, titers are run for dog Distemper, Parvovirus and Adenovirus (Infectious Canine Hepatitis).

What is a titer test?

A titer test is a simple blood test that allows us to measure how much antibody (a protein produced by the body in response to a foreign material, either natural disease or a vaccine) is in the animal’s bloodstream. From research we know what levels of antibodies are needed for protection. Animals with protective levels in the bloodstream will be able to successfully fight off the disease without the need for revaccination that year. This gives us an alternative to repeatedly vaccinating pets when they actually do not need it.  Research has shown that many adult dogs can maintain protective antibody titers to Distemper, Parvovirus and Adenovirus for more than four years and in some dogs even longer. The problem is we don’t know which dogs can do that and which dogs need more frequent boosters.

We are excited that we are now able to offer this alternative to the Distemper/Parvovirus/Adenovirus vaccine for your dog at our facility. We will be running the tests weekly and will call you with results. If your pet has a positive titer then there is no need to give the vaccine. If your pet has a negative titer then we will recommend a vaccine booster.

For more information on the test go to www.vaccicheck.com.

Other uses for the Vaccicheck test would be to test your puppy two weeks after they complete the puppy series to determine whether they have mounted adequate immunity or whether they need an additional booster. Or if you adopt a dog and are unsure if it had received the Distemper vaccine you could titer test them to see if one is needed.

Titer tests are not available for Bordetella, Leptospirosis or Lyme vaccines. These diseases are not viral and so create a different immune reaction. These vaccines continue to be recommended yearly for protection, if your pet’s lifestyle warrants it.  Rabies vaccine titers are available at outside labs but in NJ dogs are still required to have the vaccine by law. Even if they have a positive titer to the Rabies vaccine, it will not be recognized as equivalent to the proof of current vaccine by the animal control authorities.

What about cats? The same company that offers the titer test for dogs that we use will be coming out with a similar one for cats shortly. We hope to be able to offer it for your feline companion soon.

The lifestyle of each pet is different and all of our doctors are prepared to tailor your pet’s care to their individual needs for maximum protection and comfort.

 

Lorri Mitchell DVM

OCVH Veterinarian Dr. Pearlman discusses the risks of LEPTOSPIROSIS

 

Ocean County Veterinary Hospital veterinarians want to know… Do your dogs go outside? If they do they may be at risk for Leptospirosis. This disease is caused by one of the many strains of the Leptospira bacteria. Wild animals that walk through your yard, day or night, can leave the bacteria behind wherever they urinate. Remember, there is not a yard or park in New Jersey that does not have a squirrel or mouse run through it! Dogs most often become infected with Leptospirosis through contact with the bacteria that live and multiply in contaminated puddles or moist areas. Any dog that goes outside is at risk. Even when I walk my own dogs on a leash they sometimes reach down before I can stop them from investigating a puddle. We used to think that only dogs that swam in lakes or rivers, such as hunting dogs, were at risk. The fact is that many dogs diagnosed with Leptospirosis are medium to small dogs that are mostly indoors. People are at risk as well because Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease which means it can spread from animals to people.

The signs of Leptospirosis infection in dogs may vary. Some dogs do not show any signs of illness but may continue to shed the bacteria in their urine. Some develop a transient illness but recover, while many others become very sick and can even die. The signs can be nonspecific such as: lethargy, loss of appetite, fever, increased thirst and urination, vomiting, diarrhea and yellowing or bruising of the skin. There are different strains of the Leptospira bacteria and different strains target different organs. Kidney and liver failure may occur. The treatment will vary depending on the extent of the illness. Some dogs are treated with oral antibiotics alone, while others need to be hospitalized for intensive care.

If your veterinarian suspects Leptospirosis, diagnostics must be run to confirm infection. New tests, such as the Leptospirosis PCR for blood or urine, allow us to detect active infections in a shorter period of time (a few days). Chronic infections may require a blood antibody titer to be run initially and again 4 to 6 weeks later. Other tests may be recommended depending on severity of the disease and the condition of the patient.

The good news is that there is a vaccination that can help prevent Leptospirosis. We recommend it for all dogs living in New Jersey. Discuss your dog’s risk of exposure and the vaccination with your veterinarian. All of my dogs are vaccinated for Leptospirosis every year. Even though they are not outside often, I want them to be protected. Remember “Lepto” and remember there is a way to prevent this deadly disease.

 

 

 Laurie Pearlman DVM